17 Chipping Drills for Every Situation

Dan Gold
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Table Of Contents

1: Address the ball

2: Approach the ball

3: Align the address

4: Angle of attack

B

5: Ball position

6: Eye level

7: Feet position

C

8: Bend in the knees

9: Posture

10: Follow through

At-home Drills

The game of golf is a wonderful and often frustrating game. If you’re not struggling to make it around the course but are still not enjoying yourself and your scores, it might be time to look at your golf game with a critical eye.

Perhaps you could use some help playing some of the shots that golf can throw at you. A few extra tips or different swing methods could be just the things that will make you a little kinder to the course but a better opponent for the pin. Here’s a few chips you should always have in your back pocket.

Drill #1

Chip and Run

This is a great drill to work on your short game if you don’t have a chipping area and love practicing your up-and-down game. If you can’t work on your chipping during practice time, this is a great way to work on it after practice when you have a few minutes. Just grab a ball, a handful of tees, and take it to the driving range.

In a practice cage, set up five to seven balls around the hitting station. You want the tees to be close enough to hold a ball. Use a marker to mark the tees.

Once in the cage, take a five-iron or seven-wood and chip it at the tees. Your goal is to hit two balls each time you hit. After hitting one ball, pick it up. Now hit another ball.

This drill encourages repetition and is good for warming up before a round. Once you’ve hit the tees 25 or 30 times, then you’ll add a new ball next to the old ball, then another, and so on.

Continue up to 10 balls, the maximum number of balls you would have in a situation.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #2

Here’s a chipping drill that I put a lot of my short-game clients through.This is a great drill for slightly changing of technique and developing different concepts.

It’s a very small-scale drill, so feel free to use it when you have a spare 10 minutes.

Start in a good set-up position, with your feet flush to the bag, good posture and your hands directly under your shoulders. Knock the ball back into the middle of your stance, then hit it back towards the middle of the green as you would a normal chip.

Try to make the shot more of a hybrid of a pitch and a chip than a pure chip shot.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #3

This is one of my favorite golf drills. It teaches the golfer how to hit a variety of shots depending on the yardage and the lie of his ball. It also allows the golfer to practice hitting shots with a good, solid tempo, so that he can become a consistent ball striker.

I’ve also found this to be a very good golf practice drill for junior golfers, as it will help them to learn how to play shots from all around the green. It will also help junior golfers to visualize and play in their mind, the shot they are about to hit, before they actually play it.

There are a couple of different ways to practice this shot. Either hit one chip-shot after the next, or mix it up and hit a couple of low-shots and a couple of high-shots, one after the other. The low/high/hook shot is my favorite golf practice drill, because when you pull it off perfectly, it feels great and is very satisfying.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Take It To The Course

Chipping is one of the ways you can control a golf ball and still get a good score even if the fairway is out of sight. Hardpan, rough and uneven lies add to the difficulty of controlling your ball over the putting green. But armed with a chipping club and some sand wedges, you can pick up your ball quickly and easily.

Since this shot is played closer to the green than a pitch shot, you can take a stance near the ball and step into it. The grass will normally be fairly short, so it doesn’t matter if you take the club back standing on concrete. But don’t forget that a well-struck chip is another name for a well-struck sand wedge-and this shot is meant to stay on the ground!

Grip down on your wedge about an inch. The most important part of a chipping swing is getting the club into the backswing. If possible, take the club straight back and down. This will build a good rhythm into the swing.

You can make a full backswing, but it’s not required.

Make sure you get the clubface square to the left and center before you start the follow-through. You want to hit bottom before you reach the top of the swing.

Drill #4

The next drill is a simple drill that is probably more likely to come up at the beginning of the season when people hit balls off the tee and try and hit them out of trouble. Our focus will be on the chip shot.

All the players on the tees (where you're hitting the ball from) will hit a drive. They should think about getting a good consistent strike on the ball, as opposed to trying to hit the ball really far.

Everybody on the next tee will chip and run, and they should do it towards the green.

Of the players who chipped and ran, we need to see if they got it to the green in regulation. Where we really want to look at is the quality of the chip shot. If their ball stopped short of the green, we might say that we didn't quite get the right trajectory on it. If it's up on the green, the chip shot was good, but if it goes past the back pin or in the bunker … make sure that the player comes out and hits the next chip shot up with a pitching wedge.

On the next tee, this is kind of a mini-match. The players hit their drives, they get one shot, and then we go and play a little match.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #5

Tie-Down Forehand Just like a good forehand, this can either be a winner or a bogey. The purpose of this shot is to get started on the green faster. Instead of having the ball land on the green and roll out some distance, you send the ball off the face into a safe zone on the green. This can greatly save you time, especially with a fast green.

Setup: Aim to the side of the hole or a little back in your stance. Open both the clubface and stance wider than you normally would. You’ll want to hit the ball high.

Swing: Keep your setup shape during the swing and don’t start out too strong. Once the ball makes contact, it will ride along the surface of the green and into a little trap or bunker on the side of the hole.

Prevent: There’s no release involved with this shot, so you want to avoid the clubface from opening too much. Over-hitting the ball will send it careening off the green.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #6

Feel like taking up golfing this season? No time to join a golf school? Don’t worry. We’re here to help with a quick and easy guide that will put you on the green in no time.

In the days before the “golfainment” style of golf where players hit the ball out of a large cage like in a video game and get showered with neon lights and video effects, learning the game of golf was a lot of hard work. It took a lot of time and dedication to get your swing to a reliable standard and years of practice to hit that perfect drive.

Nowadays, that’s all changed. So, If you’re a golf beginner and new to the sport you’re probably looking for a set of clubs to get you started.

We’re hoping to make this a quick and easy guide that will have you cracking that first drive in no time.

What Do You Need in a Beginner Golf Set?

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #7

Putting a Slight Kick on the Ball

Purpose: For players able to hit the ball hard, the purpose is to put a tiny amount of spin on the ball to bring it a few yards to the left or right of a tight pin placement. The player has to follow through and swing the club just slightly into the ball. Then he has to keep the hands, arms, and muscles moving without any hint of a stop.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #8

Chipping from anywhere in the circle

Start in any circle, make a shoulder-width stance with your trail foot forward. Ideally, this drill should be done in a straight line and from the center of the circle, but it’s a lot of work to measure that so you can start out more towards one side to make it easier.

The goal of this drill is to make chip shots from anywhere in the circle. If you aren’t confident making the shot from the center, start just outside it or with your trail foot just in front of the center.

If you feel comfortable standing with your trail foot in the center, you can move the ball back towards the edge of the circle to make it more of a challenge.

Get Your Game On

Now you know the basics, so it’s time to practice your new skills.

The first step is to simply putt the ball everywhere and let it bounce on different surfaces.

Play a game with your ball, and let it take you on an adventure.

This way, you’ll learn how the ball responds to different surfaces and how it bounces.

You’ll also learn how to use your putter.

Continue to play around on the green until you feel comfortable.

Next, practice just the chipping part.

Take your full-sized ball and a stick or a club that’s comfortable for you.

The key is to chipping the ball as hard as you can, using your chipping club, and to learn how to control its bounce.

Place your ball on the ground and chipping it into holes you’ve made on the ground.

You can also aim for a platform about 4 feet high.

This practice drills can be the most difficult.

It requires the most accuracy, and you will learn the most this way.

Then, when you get to the real course or to a formal practice session, the other methods of chipping will come easier for you.

Drill #9

Take a lofted iron up to the green to a sand pit or over a backyard bunker.

Since you are using a lofted wedge, you have those extra few inches of bounce.

A lot of players think that a chip shot is supposed to be played from behind the ball, but that’s not true.

You have to find the sweet spot in order to make this work.

Try to get as much roll as you can by lofting your wedge.

This makes it easier to get a hands-free follow through.

Keep your ball on the green and out of trouble.

Don’t bury your wedge.

Don’t use too much force.

Remember that a chip shot is never played with a 9-iron.

Alternate clubs are important.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #10

Chipping from 25 yds. into a 45 yds. bunker

In this Chipping Golf Drill, you require a Chipper as well as a Tees and Targets. You will also require a Putter to give yourself a game.

Normally, the bunker lies just outside the edge of the green.

Your challenge for this drill is to hit some shots out of this bunker and land the ball on the green. If you are able to land the ball within the green, you will get a point. Each time you miss to make the green will decrease your scores point by one.

This is a great drill for players who are trying to improve their short game and to gain confidence for chipping for long distances. Since this drill involves a lot of distances for a chip shot, the player or the golfer will be able to develop a lot of great skills.

There are several things the player will be able to develop. These include good control over trajectory and distance, which is a must for every player that wants to improve his or her game. This drill helps loosen up the player and help them overcome the golfing competitions and relieve their stress.

The player will also be able to have a better feel of the distance. This is very important for every golfer as it is vital for them to shoot at par or below it.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #11

Fade Chipper

The Fade Chipper is a great shot because it requires you to approach the green as normal but then fade the club back and through in an effort to catch the green in the center and create a larger than normal hole for the next shot!

To do this, you're going to take some grass off the top of the green and leave a little ridge in the green. Try to keep the ball as close as possible to the original target.

If you can accomplish this, this shot works pretty often to protect the pin because you’ll be in a spot where you can put a good wedge shot to the hole to eliminate two shots.

If you're in the rough and/or use a wedge that isn’t a 60 degree or less, then you probably won't be able to get close enough to the hole.

This shot is a great way to put better pressure on your opponent and hit your next shot first on the green.

Tip: Probably the biggest key to doing this shot is to practice it at an open field so you can see where the ball finishes. You'll see the ball fade right to the flag and then fade toward the hole at the end. So practice this shot with both a fade and a draw.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Case Study:

A chipping drill is a great way to have fun with the ball. These are easy to master and can help you hit some pretty good shots.

There are many different ways to practice chipping, such as on the putting green. Certain chipping drills can be a lot of fun and help you improve your scoring ability.

No matter what kind of chipping drill you are doing, you must remain focused and not be distracted. Feel free to drink a cool glass of lemonade while practicing your chipping Drill, but remain serious and focused.

Make sure your posture is correct and that you are standing firmly on the ground. When practicing chipping drills, do not wear high heels! Nothing bothers me more than to watch golfers in high heels trying to chip the ball!

Now that I have told you to not be distracted, I must tell you that your practice chipping drills should be fun. Your game should be fun! Take the time to enjoy yourself. Don’t be in a rush to get to the next part of your golf game. Savor the moment.

It is so easy to get overwhelmed by your golf game. In your head, you can hear the clock ticking as you wait to tee off. But your practice chipping drills should help absorb your attention and be distraction-free.

This is one drill that could pay big dividends. Sure it may be fun to watch Tiger Woods shatter a ball out of the park, but we all can’t hit it 300+ yards. This drill will show you how to hit a high, soft chip that you can confidently play under pressure.

One of my favorite drills is the Key to Scoring Drill. It’s a simple drill, but it will help you get the ball in the hole from just about any distance. The key to Scoring Drill involves chipping the ball to a target, usually around 50 yards away. Make sure to pick a target that is far enough away to elevate the challenge but not so far that you can’t chip it close to it. The goal is to make solid contact with the ball so that it achieves maximum height and lands softly so you can two putt for a par.

Begin this drill hitting to the 20-yard range, it’s closer than 50, but should still be challenging. Elevate your challenge by delaying the target. Each time, move up five yards until you are chipping toward the target.

Although this drill is simple, it will increase your confidence and touch. The best part about this drill is that you can do it anywhere and not have to worry about other balls on the course.

Drill #12

Starting position: A player stands on a tennis court, with a ball directly in front of him/her. Keeping his/her arms to their sides, he/she hits the ball as hard as possible out into the back half of the court. If it goes out, the player jogs to the back of the court and hits to the same spot. The volley is played from the side, the approach from the opposite side, back and forth for three repetitions.

Coaching points: Accelerate through the ball with your arms still to your sides, rather than turning your shoulders towards the target. The goal here is to get used to coordinating the arms and torso so that the arms work towards the target rather than turning your body first.

Technique: Rally stroke

Purpose: The purpose of this drill is to improve the timing in your arm swing. Without your shoulders opening before your arms start swinging forward, they will be late and you will be unable to hit balls early.

This can be very difficult for players with poor shoulder flexibility, or who have learned to take big swings to generate power. In addition, most women start with this arm action, as they find it easier to open their shoulders rather than create hip action. By forcing them to start with their arms first, they have to learn the more difficult action of swinging their torso and hips through the ball first.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Tough Situations

Sometimes there is no other option but to chip it out. If you are facing the lip of the green, the pin is in the back, or you have a tough lie up against a fence, you simply have no other choice but to take a little off the side of your iron and pitch it onto the green.

The more difficult the situation, the more difficult the shot. And that’s where these chip shots come into play.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying you will need all of these shots in one round, but at one time in your life, you will be faced with a tough situation similar to one of these and you want to be able to hit the green and not give back the shot you just earned.

Drill #13

The Ball Roll

Description: The ball roll teaches golfers how to hit up on the ball correctly as opposed to hitting below the ball and casting the club.

Target: In the ball roll drill, golfers use a takeaway with a level head and controlled body motion.

Execution: The drill is self-explanatory. Hit balls using the correct setup but focusing on rolling the ball up the target line. Walking back to the golf ball, you will be able to see the divot pattern and ball flight.

Purpose: Getting the ball up in the air is a very important part of hitting a golf shot. In this drill, golfer builds the feel of the correct release to get the ball in the air.

Benefit: You will become a better player by hitting the ball in the air.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #14

The Two-Ball Juggler

Purpose: To develop the ability to hit chip shots when the green is very sloped from front to back.

Procedure: Set up a ball at the far end of the green, about 3 feet in front of the tee markers (protect the hole with a cone). Place a second ball as far back as possible (on the walking path or in a bunker, if available) and approximately 10 yards behind the first ball. Using a 7 to 9 iron or wedge, try to split the balls with your shots. Playing the second ball is optional.

Coaching Points:

  • Think of the ball on the deck”aim the club face to where the slope of the green will take the ball.
  • Use a short backswing; finish the swing as if you were hitting from a bunker.
  • Use outside-in swing path to avoid hitting into the hole.
  • Strike the ball on the upswing (this enables you to feel the ball running out of the rough).

Adjusting for Slope. Vary the length of the backswing (longer backswing for steeper slope, shorter backswing for a shallow slope).

Adjusting for Speed. Increase your speed a little for the steeper slope; decrease the speed a little for the shallow slope.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

You Got 3 Options

In chipping, you have 3 options. First, you can try to place your golf ball as near to the green as possible. You can also try to putt your ball as close to the hole as you can. Or thirdly, you can try to make the hole.

Most golfers I have seen struggle with chipping relates to the chosen option. Golfers will have a flash at the flag, make a mess of the approach and end up on the back of the green. The first, second and third shot options must be decided based on the distance you have to the green. Your chipping commitment is dependent on your distance and the green your approach will land on.

Nip the Chip Yips

Gripping the club firmly isn’t just for beginners. Running all the way from address to impact in an iron grip is required on every shot: sand shots, chip shots, pitches, you name it. For that reason, every chipping drill should focus on keeping the grip solid and the hands in the right place.

Practicing to maintain the iron grip during your chipping drills will help you smooth out your rhythm and control your feel. In the event of a rough or uneven lie, it will also give you the confidence you need to put a crisp edge on your chip-shots.

Here are 17 chipping drills for every situation, from short pitches to acorn lies, you’ve got them all covered.

Drill #15

The 9-Iron Drill

When you’ve been unable to hit the flagstick on a chip shot, it’s important to feel confident chipping the ball in close.

A great 3-d drill to help you improve in this area is the 9-iron drill.

As the name of the drill suggests, you chip the ball with a 9-iron. Hit the ball with finesse, and control your distance. Use a small, short, low divot. If you’re unable to chip the ball within 10 feet, then try taking a practice swing before you hit the ball.

One of the reasons I love this drill is because I also use it with my swingers. They often see me watching them hit the ball, and then we adjust our swing together.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #16

A Chipping Contest to Practice All Different Clubs

This drill is meant to be a fun contest between players. Have each player grab a club in a random order. It’s best to use more than just your trusty wedge, so grab a putter, a sand wedge, a 9-iron, a driver, a 6-iron, a 7-iron, a 5-iron, and a 4-iron. Have players try and hit the ball to a target in front of them with each club they pick. It’s common for players to be able to hit the ball closer with a club or two than with others.

You may find that you’re doing better with a 6-iron than a driver, or a 9 -iron than a 5-iron, for example. This is great information for knowing what to practice and work on.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Drill #17

The Straight Up-and-Down Chip

The next natural progression is to master the straight-up-and-down lift-and-chip shot. It is vital that you get this one down for two reasons.

The straight up-and-down lift-and-chip shot provides you with a very handy option for a very tough situation, a situation wherein you hit your 30-yard wedge shot well right of the green, but the pin is on the left side.

In this instance, you have to decide whether to hit the shot to the right of the green or hit the shot straight up the middle to the green. If you’re unsure of your ability to control your distance with the wedge, go with option two, which, if you pull it off well, will take your ball close to the hole for a potential birdie putt.

The good chipping motion is critical to the success of golf’s best putters. If you don’t get this one down, you may find yourself struggling to make short putts with any regularity.

To practice the straight up-and-down chip, run to a spot where you can hit some balls. Or go to the edge of any hole, and just hit some shots into the green. If you have a wedge handy, use it throughout this drill.

At A Glance…

Chipping is a very important skill for golfers.

Many golfers feel like chipping is not that much important in the game and they can handle their ball in the rough. But chipping is an art form. It needs to be learned and practiced. It's a very important and integral part of golf. It is not that different from your putting stroke. Without a good chipping stroke, you cannot chip the ball well.

If you do not chip a lot in practice sessions, you can't expect to chip well in the rounds. So make some time to chip on the range to practice the chips while you are at the range.

Now It's Your Turn

When learning to chip, a lot of golfers mix up “hitting down,” “skimming the ball,” and “hitting up.”It’s easy to conclude that hitting down is always right, just like it’s easy to assume that a pitch shot should be hit up. In reality, if you want to hit the ball with the best amount of control, you need to figure out how and when to get all three of these techniques involved.

You also need to decide what your goal is. Normally, putting a ball close to the pin is the objective. Sometimes, breaking one up short of the green is the smart play, while other times, you need to punch the ball out to the hole and make a run for the flag.

Mixing your chipping game up will keep your opponent guessing, increase your short game variety and help you control and hit the ball better on the green.

Here are 17 chipping drills to try in your next lesson.